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This is Part 2 of the second Short Talk by Perth Game Developers. In this video, Saxon Druce from Binary Space, talks about their experience with Flash Games Publishing.

This event featured four of Perth's top game developers talking about games they have recently released across a range of different platforms (Playstation Network, Xbox Live Indie Games, Web-based Flash, and the Apple App Store).

Part 1 can be found at:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9moHlO97NcM

For more info check out our website at LetsMakeGames.org

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Submitted by souri on Tue, 12/10/10 - 6:49 PM Permalink

Just bumping this up since it's really informative and I think a lot of people may have missed it since it didn't appear on our front page - our media aggregator picked this up and added it to the site, however, I think the video's themselves were switched to public viewing by LetsMakeGames.org on youtube a few days after they were uploaded. When the aggregator added the video's, the date stamp used was the upload date, so it was buried behind a lot more recent news items.

Lots of interesting details on Flash games publishing.

This is Part 1 of the second Short Talk by Perth Game Developers. In this video, Saxon Druce from Binary Space, talks about their experience with Flash Games Publishing.

This event featured four of Perth's top game developers talking about games they have recently released across a range of different platforms (Playstation Network, Xbox Live Indie Games, Web-based Flash, and the Apple App Store).

Part 2 can be found at:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mlJxaYMyAm4

For more info check out our website at LetsMakeGames.org

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This is Part 2 of the first Short Talk by Perth Game Developers. In this video, Aranda Morrison from Gnomic Studios, talks about XBox Live Indie Games.

This event featured four of Perth's top game developers talking about games they have recently released across a range of different platforms (Playstation Network, Xbox Live Indie Games, Web-based Flash, and the Apple App Store).

Part 1 can be found at:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qe4t6iyl8DQ

For more info check out our website at LetsMakeGames.org

Media Type:

This is Part 1 of the first Short Talk by Perth Game Developers. In this video, Aranda Morrison from Gnomic Studios, talks about XBox Live Indie Games.

This event featured four of Perth's top game developers talking about games they have recently released across a range of different platforms (Playstation Network, Xbox Live Indie Games, Web-based Flash, and the Apple App Store).

Part 2 can be found below:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NSFs2Uq14SE

For more info check out our website at LetsMakeGames.org

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Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 27/08/10 - 9:08 AM Permalink

Anyone have a link to the ppt that Duncan used during the talk?

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Sat, 28/08/10 - 12:14 PM Permalink

I was there are for that speech, asked a question at the end about the viability of the facebook games market. Duncan gave an excellent speech and well considered answers.

So you have a great team and a good idea? Are you ready to put together a business plan so you can find funding or get the enterprise start up allowance?

Duncan Curtis, Co-Owner and Director of Business Development, 3 blokes studios, takes you through the budgeting, preparation, organization and administration.

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GDAA 2009 Annual Awards Dinner, Crown Towers

- Hosted by ABC TV’s Good Game
Stephanie “Hex” Bendixsen and Steven “Bajo” O’Donnell

The GDAA Game Developer Awards are the annual awards for games development by Australian or New Zealand game developers. The Awards are managed by the Game Developers Association of Australia (GDAA), with nominations encouraged in the lead-up to the Game Connect: Asia Pacific 2009 Conference and Trade Exhibition.

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Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 13/01/10 - 1:19 PM Permalink

...easy to criticize and to condemn and I'm sure this was meant to be entertaining if not insightful (although Jason's opening contribution was both qualified and hit on a number of very salient points). Panel contributions were generally interesting. However, Yahtzee, tho a genius at prepared reviews really does not translate well into live delivery. It just doesn't carry or actually mean anything - clever or funny.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 01/02/10 - 8:35 AM Permalink

Was a lot of fun to watch.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 01/02/10 - 9:42 PM Permalink

Thanks for the video + great to hear from the panelists.

It seems that they're all talking directly or indirectly about game design as the thing in games that they 'hate'. Jason speaks about all the external conditions that lead to bad game design from publishers and developers and how being overly "conservative" is starting to wear thin. Yahtzee jokes about Natal and refers to the reductive and poorly considered game design for Wii motion controls, and finally the Game On hosts bring up game specific issues which are kind of hangovers from using archaic gating and bad meshing of game + art design. What do others think?

-- Chuan

What I Hate About Video Games: A Critic’s Perspective

Chaired by David Hewitt

featuring game industry media luminaries Yahtzee (Zero Punctuation), Jason Hill (Screenplay), and presenters from ABC TV’s Good Game Stephanie “Hex” Bendixsen and Steven “Bajo” O’Donnell

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Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 08/01/10 - 10:08 PM Permalink

What? 8 weeks for creation of a single plane asset. Seriously. Can you elaborate why it takes ~320 man hours per plane. That seems insane.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 11/01/10 - 10:20 AM Permalink

From memory it went something like:

* Basic plane itself: a week or two

* Variant skins/features: from memory, all aircraft variants were actually modeled correctly, as opposed to just consisting of a skin change. That meant new work on variants to include any extra antennas, extra gun ports, etc.

* Divide plane into various "segments" for destruction (which varied on hit location - bit hazy on this, but I think that the explosions and "cameras" for each aircraft were set up separately to be pre-canned, and as such needed individual work per plane)

* Creations of high-detail "Ace Kill" points (stuff like engines, ammo stores in wings etc often had to have INTERNAL elements modeled to support the Ace Kill feature - because you could shoot an ammo store in a wing and cause it to explode, for example, that store needed to be modeled because you saw it up close and in slow motion)

* Landing gear setup/animation rigging

* Probably a few other things...

All added up pretty hugely.

In reply to by Anonymous (not verified)

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 11/01/10 - 11:31 AM Permalink

I am not sure where Justin got 8 weeks from. It actually took 6 weeks to make a plane from start to finish.

2 weeks research and modelling.

2 weeks texturing.

2 weeks LODing, creating internal and damage elements and damage texture, animation, setup and export.

The planes for HOE where infinitely more complex and much higher res than the planes for HOTP. 15,000 verts for fighters (bombers 20,000 verts) with hundreds of nodes for the top LOD, as opposed to 5000 verts and much more simplified hierarchy for the HOTP planes.There were 5 LOD's, with the internal components included for the damage system and Ace Kill.

To do all this, six weeks was pretty tight in the end. I am very proud of the planes in HOE I think that the fact that they were not outsourced shows in the high quality of the finished assets. The planes also ended up being the smoothest and least troubled part of project and were always delivered on time.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 26/01/10 - 2:44 PM Permalink

I never made planes on the project, but the attention to detail was astounding, and a real testament to the quality of the artists working on them.

I think that in hindsight, planes became the target of outsourcing maybe because they went so smoothly, and were *somewhat* independant of the pipeline (in comparion to say the terrains, etc). If you had to package up anything and send it off, planes always seemed to be a candidate.

I guess it depends whether you actual want to retain a team of senior artists, or whether you'd prefer them to be outsource managers, and see how long they stick around.

In the current climate in games, there seems to be little scope for hd projects that value a high level of artistic quality, or where decent senior artists are actual valued, or have the sort of work that really shows off their talent, which is really sad. Good art costs time and money, and if you're making a plane game, I would suspect that planes would be a good place to consider spending that effort ;)

Thanks to Justin for the great talk, and respect out to all the Transmission Games guys, from all departments.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 29/01/10 - 10:55 PM Permalink

Good talk from Justin - and nice job summing up the issues - it is a real testament to the hard work of that team that the project was finally delivered given the challenges.

In regards to Justin's thoughts on outsourcing I disagree. We keep talking about AAA titles in Melbourne, and for anyone that went to the IGDA reboot and saw Paul Callaghan's excellent and honest appraisal of the Melbourne industry, it is obvious that we're not hitting that level, nor have been for a while.

The planes in Heroes Over Europe are at that level, and having worked with various outsourcing companies, and some good ones at that, I've not seen that sort of quality on an asset of that complexity delivered complete and correct within a 6 week period for the cost of 1 artist. The management overhead, re-work & feedback, training in visual style and efficient creation & export, cultural/language miscommunication & finally quality... it only looks better on paper...

Outsourcing is a great solution for many things given the scale and expectation of current gen titles, but I honestly don't feel you will ever get AAA out of 100% outsource, especially on your core game assets.

Submitted by souri on Fri, 08/01/10 - 11:26 PM Permalink

This session was the highlight of the conference me. An absolute eye opener. Extraordinary.

I'm certain this footage will be the *must-see* for all CEO's and upper management staff for all developers in the local industry. Huge kudas must go to Justin Halliday for explaining the whole situation so thoroughly. It was unfortunate that there was such little time left for questions and answers since I'm certain that that could have filled another half hour, at least.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 13/01/10 - 1:09 PM Permalink

This was a superb, even entertaining, breakdown of what was obviously a very complex and highly challenging (and confusing) process. It was honest yet never condemning. Justing apportioned cause and even responsibility but never blame. This is an essential study from which studios (and publishers) could and should learn a great deal. Definitely the event's highlight.

Submitted by souri on Fri, 15/01/10 - 11:17 AM Permalink

I'm reading the post-mortem at Gamasutra on Torus's Scooby-Doo! First Frights, and I think these sorts of insights would be great if they appeared more often at GCAP. Perhaps having at least one post-mortem presentation could be a regular thing at the conference. I can understand that there may be issues with publishers, and no one wants to air out the major problems at their studio (and in any case, post-mortems aren't usually as straight-to-the-point / blunt as the Heroes one), but for the sake of learning and even getting feedback on solving some of the problems presented, I think it's worth it.

For example, I don't think there was one person in the conference room whose jaw did not drop when Justin showed the amount of image stamping required by artists in the London map for Heroes over Europe. That was completely *insane* (even if later on they could use groups of stamps, it's still quite a large amount of work). But how does a problem like this get solved, particularly by other studios who do these very large scaled maps that are sized in the tens of kilometres? I know games like Quake Wars was delayed a year, and the mega-texture technology for that was partly to blame (giving artists the freedom to stamp unique textures everywhere means a mammoth amount of extra work - id's Rage has got to be going through the same issue), but with maps in these days getting even larger and larger and more detailed, how does this issue get resolved more efficiently than throwing a mega-tonne time and artists to manually stamping these images everywhere.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 15/01/10 - 2:03 PM Permalink

I don't think the megatexture stuff added much extra time to Quake Wars at all, in face most of the terrain textures were all rebuilt not too long before release relatively quickly. It's one of those things where you can just push the generate terrain button like with older style methods and be done with it, and then add more details if you have time.

Now with the all encompassing method being used by Rage, that is probably an issue. Although you can still just texture things conventionally and have all the megatexture be generated off that adding no extra work.

How Heroes Over Europe, the sequel to Heroes of the Pacific, blew its budget, slipped 18 months and sank a company

- Justin Halliday

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