Questions about Griffith and AIE

I'm not an australian resident, but am considering education related to art/animation/game-design. (even not game related programs, because as a foreigner any education helps attaining visas, and art fascinates me as a whole)

A few questions for people who have/are attending these 2 schools :

AIE : I hear people going for 2years, but i only saw two design related diplomas - one is the screen diploma and other is game/animation art.
1. Is there a diploma running over 2 years or did those students simply take both diplomas ?
2. As someone who has a general idea of the 3d dingo, i am wondering if the courses simply offer an overview about software functionalities, or do they provide art related skills and critique (such as drawing, anatomy, or whatever isn't just how to do keyframes in maya or unwrap an object)

Griffith University :
3. On the 3d part of the program which software is used (maya,3dsmax, or what ?)

Thanks for reading, and hope to see some responses :)

c8's picture

Hi Chai,

I work here at AIE Melbourne, and hopefully can answer some of your questions, and hope that some of our graduates/students will give you some feedback also.

Firstly, I will say that AIE courses are very focused on providing our students the skills they will use in the Games and related 3D industries.
This means that our courses feature advanced 3D techniques, rather than art theory. Students also undertake some lifedrawing components, this is relatively smaller.

Students come to AIE with artistic skills and learn 3D as the medium of their art. This is why students also need to provide a portfolio of artwork as part of the application process, so AIE tutors can assess a students artisitic merit and ability to create in a 3D medium.

The Diploma of Computer Game Development is a 1 year course, however most students without extensive 3D experience will undertake the Certificate IV in Screen (available in Melbourne)or Certificate IV in 3D Animation for Games and Film (available in Canberra)to develop the fundamental 3D modelling, texturing and animating skills required for the Diploma level courses.

If you can demonstrate that you already have these skills you can apply for direct entry into the Diploma Programs. The diploma programs are structured so students can develop individual showreels and gain practical experience which assists students in finding industry employment. This practical emphasis is a huge advantage to our students, with over 80% of 2005 graduates currently working in the Games and Film Industries.

I guess you need to decide if you want to do a vocational course that will equip you for a career in games and related 3D industries, or are you more interested in increasing your artistic knowledge?

Goodluck with your decisions and future.

For further information I can be contacted on enquiries@aie.vic.edu.au

Chai's picture

Thanks for the well written and honest reply, appreciate it :)

Mikeylee's picture

so 80% of Graduates are working in 2005, do you have any more recent figures?

Neilb's picture

[QUOTE=Mikeylee] so 80% of Graduates are working in 2005, do you have any more recent figures?[/QUOTE]

What c8 wrote was "over 80% of 2005 graduates currently working in the Games and Film Industries. "

The 2005 graduates are the most recent graduates and will be until the current final-year students become 2006 graduates at the end of this year.

DoubleSupercool's picture

The AIE courses do not focus on background art theory.

Two other things to consider (cost wise) are that as a foreign student I don't believe you will be able to get the subsidised rate for the Cert IV course, which puts the price up considerably.

Also, the 2nd year games course is not subsidised while the film course is.

I did the film course and got offered a job compositing cinematics within 3mths of starting the course. 3 of my mates in the games course just got jobs as well.

Of course, this all comes down to how good you are and how you sell yourself ;)